Chicago PD Season 10 Premiere Review – Let It Bleed

Reviews

Wow, that was an emotionally heartbreaking conclusion to a multi-episode arc on Chicago PD. 

Anna gave it her all to bring down Escano and Los Temidos, but it wasn’t without casualties. 

On the Chicago PD Season 9 finale, Anna got too muddled in the case and lost her way. And admittedly, Voight also lost control of the situation. 

He didn’t want to admit it, but this is the first time that we’ve seen Voight slightly unhinged by a case. It was also the first time we’ve seen him so emotionally connected to a CI.  

Upon realizing that they were burned, Voight extracted Anna, who began spiraling almost immediately at the thought of what comes next. 

Voight tried to assure her that it wasn’t over and that he wouldn’t let anything happen to her, but Anna lost faith in herself and Voight a long time ago. She was convinced that without any evidence against Escano, she would end up like all of his men — dead. 

The gutwrenching thing is that if Anna had just listened to Voight and trusted that he was good for it, she would’ve come out of this on the other side because everything that Voight promised came to fruition. If she stayed put, she would’ve been in witness protection for a short moment, she would’ve reconnected with Rafa, and she would’ve been able to see the fruits of her labor. She would have watched as the Chicago PD made the biggest drug bust in history all thanks to her. 

She would have gotten her revenge, she would have gotten recognition, and she would have gotten a fresh start. 

But sadly, none of that happened. From the moment they found Escano on the ground bleeding out at the bakery, it was a downward spiral. 

Escano’s dying declaration was that Anna stabbed him. 

Anna went off the rails, escaped the safe house, and killed the man she thought was going to kill her. She didn’t think that Voight would follow through, so in her mind, killing Escano was worth the risk because at least she would be safe. 

Voight thought he could still salvage the case, and he went to great lengths to save Anna mostly because the guilt of bringing her into this was consuming him. 

He never wanted it to go south, and when he’s in charge of cases, they usually don’t, so he was almost navigating new territory.

But he was willing to risk it all to make sure that she got out as promised. 

I wanted to hate Anna for leaving behind such a mess, but the truth is, I understood her motivation and fear. The kill was, in a twisted sense, justified. 

The ASA questioning is what really set Anna’s rogue plan into motion because it fed into her biggest fear — that they didn’t have anything on Escano. 

They didn’t have any evidence of him committing any crimes, so there was nothing to move on. It wasn’t far-fetched to think that he would become a ghost and fade away into the background, and Anna worried that she’d constantly be looking over her shoulder after betraying him. 

The fact that Voight lied to her also played a role because she didn’t feel like she could trust him. It’s hard to trust that a cop doesn’t have his own best interest at heart, and Anna couldn’t see that Voight wasn’t like the others. 

She led him, Jay, and Hailey (“where you go, I go”) on a wild goose hunt that ultimately ended in a way too public situation. 

Voight was all about doing things on the down-low, but Anna’s actions brought too much attention to everything. There was a time when Voight could have likely figure out an escape plan, but once she pointed the gun at him in the middle of the street, it was a lost cause. 

At that point, Anna wasn’t in the right state of mind. She was spiraling because she killed a man, she was spiraling because she wanted to get away — it was a mix of fear and adrenaline all wrapped up in an explosive combo. 

Voight tried to talk her down from a ledge, but the more he pressed, the more she pushed back until she finally pulled the trigger and shot him in the shoulder. 

From there, it was all a whirlwind. Everything happened so fast that I had to rewind and rewatch a few times. 

Of course, Hailey and Jay both took a shot at Anna when they saw her shoot Voight because a shot at the police is a shot at the police, it doesn’t matter what relationship you have. 

But even then, Voight remained by her side because he knew he dragged her to the depths of hell partly for selfish reasons. 

CHICAGO P.D. — “You and Me” Episode 922 — Pictured: Carmela Zumbado as Anna — (Photo by: Lori Allen/NBC)

Anna’s actions weren’t indicative of her personality, they were a byproduct of the situation she was placed in. I can’t say she was forced into the situation because she willingly volunteered her efforts throughout the investigation — and while Voight did push her a few times when she said she wanted out, it’s because they invested too much time building up the trust. 

The moment she took the shot, you could tell she regretted it. Her final words were an apology to Voight; It seemed as though she regained a form of lucidity after being shot and realized that she contributed heavily to the deteriorating situation. 

Unfortunately, Anna didn’t survive the two gunshot wounds to the chest. She died at the hospital with Voight by her side. It was a truly emotional moment, especially when you consider the guilt that he’ll carry with him and the fact that she didn’t get to see Rafa one last time. But mostly, it was tragic because it didn’t have to be this way.

As doctors were trying to revive her as she coded, their “clear’s” paralleled the “clear’s” echoing from the unit as they searched the stash house.

And it was a gold mine as they unearthed so many drugs all linked to some of the biggest drug dealers in the city. 

It’s a shame Anna never got to see this moment come to life, but she can rest easy knowing that she helped Chicago clean up its streets. No other young woman or man is ever going to fall victim to Escano’s evil ways. 

My only wish is that we found out how Escano caught onto Anna. Was he the one who ordered her rape and was able to identify her?

The fact that moments prior to his death he blew up a truck full of drugs would have allowed Voight to easily pin this on a rival gang. Ugh, I’m just so sad Anna didn’t reach the finish end!

It was refreshing to see Jay finally in Voight’s corner. Halstead has his moments. He’s a pretty straight and narrow kind of guy, but even he couldn’t deny that Anna didn’t deserve to pay the price for what occurred. 

I do, however, like that he reminds Voight that he needs to button up the situation. Voight sort of had rose-colored glasses on as he assumed his will to help Anna would be enough, but Halstead came at it more pragmatically. He wanted to find an actual solution that would stick and keep everyone safe — Anna and the team. 

Upton rode my last nerve because she just couldn’t get off her damn high horse. Why is she so infuriating? It’s understandable that she wouldn’t want to go down this road again, but the judgment was so sickening. Covering up a murder was fine when it was a case that she felt passionate about, but because she didn’t really care for Anna, she wanted to hold some moral high ground. 

Wanting to stay on the right path is admirable, but you can’t be a hypocrite about it. Instead of preaching about it, it would’ve been helpful if she gave some kind of solution instead. She could’ve shown some remorse or some desire to help Anna out of the mess. 

I don’t have to remind her that where there’s a will, there’s a way, even if it doesn’t seem obvious at first. And I love that Halstead hit back by reminding her that they went the extra mile for her when she needed it.

The thing with Voight is that he doesn’t just go astray or cover up crimes for anyone — when he does it, it’s understandable because he knows that the system is rigged and often favors the person that should be paying the ultimate price. 

Sometimes, you just have to return the favor, Hailey. 

This job has never been black or white, and she’s naive to think that eliminating the gray spaces is possible. She came around in the end, but honestly, it was too late at that point. I know this sounds mean, but maybe she should’ve just taken some time following the explosion to recover. 

I love Ruzek, Bugress, and Atwater. They remain unproblematic. When Voight says to keep it off the books, they’re all like “weird, but okay.” They didn’t question — they just followed orders and delivered the Los Temidos gang on a silver platter. That’s not always the case with them, but they definitely get a gold star this time around. 

Voight was also a beast when he convinced Chapman — sorry, forced — to give pull strings and get him arrest warrants. 

He knew that he could deliver the cartel to Chapman, and if she agreed to help, he would credit her with the bust and build up her career. 

Chapman made the right choice in the end because wow, you do not want to get on Voight’s bad side. He knows the moves to destroy a career just as quickly. 

A special shout-out goes out to whoever managed to get everyone on board with a shirtless Voight. It was a bold choice considering it wasn’t exactly a “thirst trap” friendly moment, but I’m petitioning for more opportunities like this one.

And lastly, props to Carmela Zumbado on her performance! Her character was such a riveting addition to the season, so it was a shame to see her go out like that! 

What did you think of the finale? Was a part of you hoping that Anna would somehow turn her whole life around and go from CI to murderer to detective? Did you think Voight pushed too hard to save Anna or was it justified? Do you think Voight is too corrupt for the gig or does he have integrity by helping those who have helped him?

Share your thoughts in the comments — and we’ll see you for new episodes in the fall! 

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